Hendrik Susan en sy Orkes - Kom Dans met Hendrik Susan
Cover
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LINER NOTES

 

DANS SAAM MET HENDRIK SUSAN

Op hierdie plaat speel Hendrik Susan en sy Orkes 'n paar van die Gewildste Afrikaanse wysies—Speciaal vir u dansgenot aangebied.

'n Gallotone lankspeelplaat
met fyn groewe en lewensgetroue klankweergawe

Gallo (Afrika) Beperk
Presidentstraat 161
Johannesburg
 

HENDRIK SUSAN EN SY ORKES
KOM DANS MET HENDRIK SUSAN


recorded 1954c
issued 1954c
Gallotone (red)
Gallo
made in South Africa
GLP 101
matrix DRL 2280
matrix DRL 2281
33 rpm 10" LP
first issue
cover printed by Clegg
source: flatinternational Archive

TRACK LISTING

 

1.1Sarie Marais

(tradisioneel)

1.2Boegoeberg Se Dam

(tradisioneel)

1.3Suikerbossie

(tradisioneel)

1.4Uitkyk-Wals

(Fanie Bosch)

2.5Warmpatat

(Nico Carstens)

2.6Bokkie

(Hansie van Loggerenberg)

2.7Bobbejaan Klim die Berg

(tradisioneel)

2.8Hartseer-Wals

(tradisioneel)

ARTISTS

 

HENDRIK SUSAN
HENDRIK SUSAN EN SY ORKES

NOTES

 

This could be the first 10" LP issued by Gallo records. If anything the cover is quite unique in that it features a sewn edge unlike the more commonly seen flip-back edge on other GLP issues. Louis Meintjies dates the first long playing vinyl records pressed by Gallo to 1952, though Rob Allingham suggests that this LP came out around 1954.

In 1938 Pieter de Waal of the SABC approached Hendrik Susan about forming a band that would re-constitute an Afrikaans music in the form of a “boereorkes” for radio. These were the early days of Afrikaans broadcasting. The state-run SABC had only been formed in 1936 as an official act of parliament, after an investigation by Herzog into the financial dealings of its commercial predecessor, the ABC. South African radio prior to this time was dominated by English programming but in 1937 two services were established in English and Afrikaans. Of the six members of Hendrik Susan’s band three were English and had to change their names accordingly, and the music they played marked the beginning of what became known as “boeremusiek”.

Hendrik Susan and his band became political symbols when his band chose to follow and broadcast each night from the 1938 centenary celebrations of the Great Trek. They were so successful that for many years they became identified with the National Party. Perhaps with some irony, it is interesting to note that Susan in his earlier years had performed (on sax and violin) with the Jazz Maniacs (Solomon ‘Zuluboy’ Cele and Wilson Silgee’s band) at the Orange Grove.

Notes adapted from Ralph Trewhela's account of Hendrik Susan in Song Safari.